Home arrow more... arrow Jul - Sep 2002 arrow Nokia commends approval of CDMA2000 1xEV-DV as 3G standard by the ITU
Nokia commends approval of CDMA2000 1xEV-DV as 3G standard by the ITU

www.nokia.com

Nokia applauds the publication of CDMA2000 1xEV-DV (data and voice) by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) and the subsequent approval by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) as an official 3G standard. This new specification was successfully supported by a number of companies, including Nokia, Motorola, Sprint and Texas Instruments. The CDMA2000 1xEV-DV standard represents a practical and efficient evolution path for CDMA2000 1x carriers transitioning to third generation networks.

"With the CDMA2000 1xEV-DV solution and its ability to have voice and data users in the same band, carriers are able to best optimize the cost of deployment of their 3G network according to the real data needs of their customers," said Soren Petersen, senior vice president and general manager of CDMA for Nokia. "Users also benefit from CDMA2000 1xEV-DV networks, not only from improved speeds, but by being able to simultaneously perform voice and data tasks on the same device, which Nokia sees as being an important piece of the 3G picture."

CDMA2000 1xEV-DV offers peak data rates of 3-5 Mbps and a typical throughput rate of 1 Mbps in a 1.25 MHz frequency channel, all while providing operators the flexibility to balance their voice and data traffic by dynamically allocating bandwidth on demand. CDMA2000 1xEV-DV also enables services such as streaming video by providing a real-time packet data connection and` provides full legacy support for existing IS-95 and CDMA2000 1x devices.

"CDMA2000 1xEV-DV allows users to perform two high-value tasks simultaneously on a single RF section device. For example, a user could download e-mail from a corporate server while on a voice call, minimizing the down time resulting from performing these tasks individually," said Adam Gould, CDMA chief technology officer for Nokia. "The ability to perform concurrent voice and data sessions also opens up the possibility for developers to create compelling new tools, such as rich multimedia applications for remote presentations or virtual meetings."